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  • August 17, 2014

    John Raggio

    Hi Matt. Thanks so much for the video. It was very clear and will help me better use TPE for moonrise photos. Quick question, how can I use TPE to figure out when the moon will rise above a large city skyline, or be above or between two large buildings? I can’t see how using the gray pin would help given the altitude of the building is much higher than its base.

    Thanks,
    John

  • August 16, 2014

    Michael

    Can’t wait to see the Part II! I’ve been wondering if it’s worth the difference for some time. That extra bit of cash could mean an extra prime lens!

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 19, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Having used the Canon non-IS f/2.8 for years and the Tamron f/2.8 for thousands of shots, I’ve never looked at one of my photos and said “Man, I wish this lens was just a little sharper”. They’re both fantastically sharp to begin with… so it’s hard to imagine that that extra $1000 would really be worth it unless your photography really depends on resolution.

  • August 16, 2014

    wco

    I’d hold off on buying the D7100 now, unless you had to have a camera right away.

    Photokina is coming in mid September and Nikon is expected to introduce new products.

    Rumors are that they will announce another new FX body. But it’s also the case that the D7100 is two years old so due for an update. Could be why they’re offering rebates to get rid of inventory.

  • August 16, 2014

    Andrew

    Hi Matthew,
    I have a Nikon D80 but wanted to upgrade to include video and higher resolution. The 7100 seems closer to the D80 in look and feel, but I’m not sure I need to spend the extra $ over the 5300. I take lots of group photos in low light (in churches) and landscapes. The videos will be of the kids. What do you think?

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 16, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Hi Andrew,

      You’re right… the D7100 will feel much more like the D80 than the D5300 would, but in terms of image quality, you’ll get just as much out of the D5300. Keep in mind that if you have any old, non-motorized lenses, they’re work with the D7100 and D80, but not with the D5300. Speaking of which, my general advice is always to buy the least expensive camera that will satisfy your photographic needs, and buy the best lenses you can afford… a good large aperture lens will do much more for your low light shots than spending more on the D7100.

      That said, there is something to be said for working with equipment that you enjoy and that feels good in the hand. Being inspired and passionate is a big part of producing great images… so you’ll have to decide how important it is to you for the camera to feel like your D80. It may be worth it, psychologically.

      Good luck!

      - Matthew

  • August 15, 2014

    Amr

    Hey Matthew,

    Thank you for very helpful written review!

    I’m confused about getting a new lens for a friend of mine ” like a gift ” , she owns Canon 550D with EF-S 18-55mm IS lens
    Which one would you suggest !

    and does EF-S 55-250 IS STM work on canon 550D ! because some people said the STM version is useless on canon 550D.

    Thanks

  • August 13, 2014

    Shilpa

    Hello Mathew,
    I read your article and I am hoping you will provide an indepth solution to me as well. You keep emphasisnig the fact that the choice of the camere depends on your needs. So I am going to be specific with my requirements so you can help me choose.
    I have been reading different articles but I never came across the problem I seem to face with my d5000. I am a novice and ended up buying d5000 in 2010 as my first dslr having no idea what to choose. I was too excited getting my slr and went on a clicking spree as I had a willing subject which was my brand new baby. I loved photographing her every minute and in 3 mons ended up having severe tendinitis as wierd as it may sound.
    Here’s the problem, d5000 takes ages to focus. It keeps hunting constantly for a focal point again and again pinching my tendon every single time it doesn’t come to focus. The subject being a baby, its almost impossible to catch the shot I want, forcing me to click more than necessary. The pain from tendinitis is so excruciating that if I click some 30-40 pics a day, I would have to rest my hand for a week. I thought this was how all SLR’s are until 6 months ago when I shot some 200 pictures from T1i at my Brothers In Law wedding. It was focusing at lightning speed and my arm was at total ease even after shooting 100-200 pics. Not a single day went by without regretting not buying cannon since that day. And now I have to live with tendinitis for the rest of my life, thanx to my d5000. I elaborated my problem so you can tell me if its my camera’s fault or my lens or my own settings? If its my camera, I am ready to move on.

    Cameras shortlisted : Cannon 60d/70d or 7d and Nikon d90 or d7000/d71000 (although I hate Nikon, had to shortlist coz of the reviews) OR you could totally suggest a new one based on my needs.

    Here’s what I am looking for:
    1. Something really easy for my arm. Has to come to focus instatntly and light weight.
    2. Love to take portraits with shallow depth. (Again, I need you to advise if I can go with kit lens or 50 mm prime lens, Whichever is easy on my arm)
    3. HD videos with blurred background.
    4. Running toddler.
    5. Low light pictures
    6. Something that screams professional when you look at the image.

    I am a total amateur and usually click images using scene mode but I cannot emphasize how much I love blurred backgrounds bringing the subject to sharp focus. I am not a technical person, so I dont understand cross points and a lot of other jargon. I always loved photography and bought my first dslr hoping to hone my skills but took a backseat instead. But after shooting with t1i and realising that not all cameras are painful after all, my passion for photography is back again. Since my first camera sank $1000 down the drain, I want this to be a wise investment so I can grow into it and not replace it with anything else later.

    My purchase will solely depend on your advice.

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 14, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Hi Shilpa,

      I’m afraid that my advice isn’t going to be very satisfying this time. When it comes to ergonomics, there’s no substitute for holding a camera in your hand and testing it. Sometimes a large grip will cause less stress, sometimes a small one will… sometimes a lighter camera is more comfortable, sometimes a heavier one.

      That said, if a Canon T1i was comfortable for you, the Canon T series has changed very little since its release. The T5i would be a good place to start testing, and the Canon 70D would be a good follow-up. The 70D is the better camera, but it’s larger. Both focus quickly (with a good lens), shoot HD video (but the 70D has better, much faster autofocus for video), they’re pretty good in low light.

      No matter what camera you own, even if it’s an $6500 Canon EOS 1D X, no camera is going to take pictures that look professional all the time unless you know what you’re doing… and probably not even then. Taking professional-looking photos requires a lot more than an expensive camera. However, ANY DSLR is going to be capable of taking professional looking photos… so that will depend on you and how much time and learning you’re willing to put into it.

      I would start this process by watching two of my videos, incidentally. First, the 3 basics:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-NhJua5NFA

      and then, since you mentioned it, the one about cross-points: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbXJpVsTwo8

      When it comes to professional image quality, nothing is more important than the lens that you choose, and that depends heavily on what you want to shoot and what compromises you’re willing to make. Using a 50mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 lens will be fast, light, give you shallow depth of field, be excellent in low light, but they’re not flexible in terms of zoom range. You have to get used to shooting at 50mm only… and a lot of people have a hard time with that.

      My advise would be to buy a T5i body or 70D kit with the new 18-135mm STM lens, and add on the 50mm f/1.8 lens for an extra $100. Again, you’ll need to test the bodies with that lens to make sure it’s comfortable for you.

      Good luck!

      - Matthew

      • August 16, 2014

        Shilpa

        Hello Matthew,

        I am elated to see your prompt response covering all the aspects.

        Firstly, I agree with you a 100% that I have to personally test different cameras to find out which one works for my hand. I did go to Best buy with the same idea to try and click their display models but they dont have any. If I buy and return, there would be a restocking fees. Do you have any suggestions how I can try a bunch of cameras ruling out friends as an option.

        secondly, assuming Nikon D90 and D7000 work for me. Can I use my current D5000 18mm-55mm lens and 55mm-200mm lens on either of the cameras depending on what I buy, of course. (This is just to save some money since I have the lenses already) OR Is it the lens that is causing me the pain in the first place?

        Lastly, I admit its the photographer and not the camera that can make it look professional. I was just too excited to get started again. I loved watching your awesome tutorials that had loads of information. You just made me subscribe.

        Thanks a ton for your guidance.

        • Avatar of Matthew Gore
          August 19, 2014

          Matthew Gore

          Hi Shilpa.

          When it comes to trying out new cameras, I suppose it all depends on where you are. My local Best Buy and even WalMart has some, but there are 3 or 4 camera shops around Seattle that have much better selections and I can try whatever I want. Amazon.com generally doesn’t have re-stocking fees. If you have a local photography/camera club, you might try going for a meeting and seeing what people have.

          Any lens that will work on a D5000 will also work on any other Nikon DSLR. It’s hard to say whether they’re part of the problem you experienced, but it seems like they might be a factor, either with speed or ergonomics. Again, testing is the only way to know for sure.

          Good luck!

          - Matthew

  • August 13, 2014

    Kets

    Hi Matthew,

    Am struggling to decide which model to go for, either d5300 or d7100 this will be me very first dslr camera. I want to use this camera for landscape, portrait, sports (football) night shots etc etc etc. can you please tell me which if the 2 camera I should purchase.
    Thanks.

  • August 11, 2014

    trixie

    regarding the high-speed syc limitation of the d5300; would using a neutral density filter provide a workaround this problem?

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 11, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Yes…. sorta. If you only have to deal with a couple of f-stops worth of light, then it’s not too big a deal. However, if you’ve ever tried to shoot an event with neutral density filters over your lens, especially dark ones, you’ll know that it’s not as easy as it sounds… visibility can be a problem, and autofocus can be a problem.

      But yes… it can get your camera down into sync speed range at a large aperture. Also, you can change the environment…. shoot in shade, create shade, darken the lights, etc.

      - Matthew

      • August 11, 2014

        trixie

        thanks for the information. one more question: with the d7100, you can run the hss with the built in flash whereas with the canons, (i.e. t5i or t3i), you have to use an external speedlite?

      • August 13, 2014

        trixie

        and the 60d / 70d also requires an external flash to make the hss operational?

        • Avatar of Matthew Gore
          August 13, 2014

          Matthew Gore

          No… actually, with Canon, all of the cameras have wireless flash control with the pop up ( if there is one) and high speed sync… even the T5i.

  • August 11, 2014

    Matt Bach

    What about the wireless/wifi capability between the 5300 and 7100. I’m trying to convince my boss to have my work purchase the d7100. I shoot a lot of meetings and events (currently with my personal D3100 and D5000) in large darkly lit rooms with moderate success. But I would like to have a camera that does a better job with this and also allows me to quickly upload photos onto our social media pages as it happens. Can you help me explain to my boss with which camera am I better off and why?

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 11, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Hmm… that’s a tall order. The fact is, you can quickly and easily add wifi to just about any camera with an eye-fi card, and they’re pretty cheap. But of course, the D5300 has built-in wifi and GPS, and with the D7100, you’d have to buy either the eye-fi or Nikon’s add-on wireless adapter.

      From what you’ve given me, I can’t think of any reason that I’d recommend the D7100 over the D5300. They’re both great in low-light, though… they’ll give you better resolution than the D3100 or D5000 with lower noise.

      Good luck!

      - Matt

  • August 4, 2014

    Gayal Chamin

    Dear MATTHEW GORE,

    Im really interesting to do Wedding video and music video with Dslr .
    can you tell me which one is good for that ? 700d(t5i) or 70d ?.
    i really like t5i . can i get good video quality form that? . really i dont have big bujet.
    thank you.

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 4, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Hi Gayal,

      Yes, you’ll be able to get excellent video quality from both cameras. The main difference is that the 70D has better autofocus than the 700D. If you use manual focus or can live with moderately slow autofocus with the 700D/T5i, then it’s a great place to start.

      Good luck!

      - Matthew

      • August 4, 2014

        Gayal Chamin

        Dear Matthew,

        Thank you very much for the quick reply.. really appreciate your opinion,
        starting with low budget its time to move for 700d/t5i.

        thank you again, best wishes for your lovely web site.

  • August 3, 2014

    Varinder Grover

    Hi, i recently buy canon 60 D with 18-55 and 55-250 kit lens i need help that if i sell both lens and buy a used Canon 70-200mm F4L it will be a good decision

    or i buy 18-135

    or continue with the same kit i received 18-55 and 55-250
    thanks

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 3, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      Hi Varinder,

      There are a few things to consider. The 70-200 f/4L will give you extremely sharp images… sharper than those you’d get from any of the other lenses in question. However, losing everything below 70mm (112mm APS-C) is pretty significant.

      So, it really depends on how you shoot. If you never or rarely shoot wide-angle (or even “normal” range) photos, then it’s easy… go with the 70-200. If you heavily shoot wide angles, then consider other options. Ideally, I’d stick with your 18-55 and add the 70-200… save a little longer if necessary.

      Between the 18-135 and the 2 zooms… the two will give you better image quality (less distortion, higher resolution… though not dramatically), whereas the 18-135 gives you the convenience of having more range in a single lens and faster autofocus (if you buy the STM… and you should NOT buy the non-STM), but at the cost of the telephoto range beyond 135mm.

      Again, which one is best for you truly depends on what you shoot or want to shoot. There’s no right answer for everyone, I’m afraid!

      - Matthew

    • August 6, 2014

      Varinder Grover

      Thanks a lot for advise me and one more question for movie making 70-200 is better or 55-250 pl advised me

      • Avatar of Matthew Gore
        August 6, 2014

        Matthew Gore

        If you get the 70-200mm f/4 IS USM, then you’ll get a slightly more contrasty image… maybe a little sharper, but probably not, since we’re talking about a 2 megapixel image at 1080p. At the 200mm range, you’ll get better subject separation and bokeh with the f/4 lens, too, as well as an extra f-stop of light.

        If you don’t get the IS model, then the 55-250 will have the stabilization advantage.

        - Matthew

  • July 25, 2014

    Olivia

    Hi Matthew,

    Here’s my only deal: this is my first real camera, and I’m a poor college student. I’ll be going abroad to Europe for the whole year, and I would love something durable‚Ķ that’s what attracts me to the D7100. But is the D5300 durable enough? What do you suggest for a year of backpacking and travel?

    Thank you so much!

    • Avatar of Matthew Gore
      August 11, 2014

      Matthew Gore

      In my experience, the polycarbonate bodies of modern SLRs are very tough… I’ve used them hard and never had one break on me (though I can’t say the same for battery grips). They’re definitely lighter and nicer to carry around if you’re traveling… I think the D5300 sounds like a great idea.

      - Matthew

  • July 22, 2014

    Josh Thies

    Thanks very much mate. That’s a great help and unfortunately what I feared… (TN panels not being able to produce the desired colours) Thanks again for your response!